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YONCOPIN 



19 2 2 



Volu m e I 




PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF 

CENTENARY COLLEGE 
Shreveport, La. 



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ORDER OF BOOKS 

Book I 
THE COLLEGE 

Book II 
CLASSES 

Book III 
LITERARY 

Book IV 

ORGANIZATIONS AND 

SOCIETY 

Book V 
ATHLETICS 

Book VI 
THE ACADEMY 



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In the preparation of this, the first issue of the YoNCOPIN, 
it has been our desire that the book should be permeated with 
the real atmosphere of Centenary College in 1922. Doubtless 
no institution of similar nature ever experienced a more rapid 
growth of college spirit than that which has so gloriously budded 
and blossomed in the school this year. 

In this annual every department of the school, every phase of 
the college life has been given space. But how to represent 
each part in its due proportion has indeed been difficult. While 
we have found it easy to exploit our achievements in athletics — 
scores talk for themselves — we have discovered how nearly im- 
possible it is to transcribe in black and white that deep, earnest 
spirit of true fellowship so prevalent at Centenary. 

But in sending forth this little volume we hope that the 
reader may catch something of this spirt of New Centenary. 



Liili 





YONCOPIN, 1922 





DR. GEORGE S. SEXTON 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Board of Trustees 



Officers 

Dr. Jno. L. Scales President 

Mr. J. C. Foster Vice-President 

Dr. W. W. Drake Secretary 

Mr. T. C. Clanton Treasurer 

Members 

Rev. Wm. ScHUHLE Coushalta, La. 

Mr. E. A. Frost Shreveport, La. 

Mr. J. B. ARDIS Shreveport, La. 

Rev. W. W. Holmes Lake Charles, La. 

Mr. R. O. Randle Monroe, La. 

Mr. Jno. B. Hutchinson Shreveport, La. 

Mr. J. A. FOSTER Lake Charles, La. 

Rev. Briscoe Carter Minden, La. 

Mr. T. W. HolLOMAN Alexandria, La. 

Mr. Jno. M. Robinson La Chuta, La. 

Dr. R. H. Wynn Shreveport, La. 

JUDGE A. J. Murff Shreveport, La. 

Dr. R. D. Webb Minden, La. 

Mr. A. J. PEAVY Shreveport, La. 

Mr. F. D. Gunter New Orleans, La. 

Rev. J. G. Snelling New Orleans, La. 

Mr. G. S. PRESTRIDGE Shreveport, La. 

Mr. R. T. Moore Shreveport, La. 

Mr. Frank T. Whited Shreveport, La. 

Mr. J. W. Atkins Shreveport, La. 

Judge W. G. Banks Shreveport, La. 



Page eight 





pprmatinn 



THERE was an Old Centenary College, from whose halls 
came hundreds of the most stalwart men of the nation. 
From Centenary came men who in pre-war days de- 
fended Anglo-Saxon liberty and states rights against the ever 
encroaching ideas of communism and "Centralization." From 
Centenary, after the Civil War, came men whose undaunted 
souls became a bulwark against an overturned social system 
and the more dangerous political menace of "Reconstruction." 
Then her strength abated until her past was only a memory of 
"other days." Her glory was only a dream. 

There is a New Centenary College on the verge of taking 
its place again among the leading colleges of the South. Men 
have put the old dream into reality. These men, coming from 
all denominations, bonded together in the Rotary Club of 
Shreveport, have raised for the college an endowment fund that 
has put the school on a firm foundation and made possible a 
future that shall outrival the past of this Southern institution. 

For largeness of vision, for untiring zeal, for personal sacri- 
fice and effort, the students of Centenary College render thanks 
to the Rotary Club. 

Students 1922. 



Page 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





History ox Centenary College 

ENTENARY COLLEGE has a most historic past and the brightest of pros- 
pects lor the future. It received the name Centenary because its history as a Meth- 
odist institution reaches back to 1839, the one hundredth year after the organiza- 
tion of the first Methodist society in England by John Wesley, when the first centenary 
offerings were taken for Christian education. The college was first located at Brandon, 
Miss., but as this location proved unforLunaie in every respect, it was moved in 1845 to 
Jackson, La. In moving to Jackson, Centenary College had selected a most historical 
spot, for there, years before, Ponce c!e Leon in his search for the Fountain of Youth 
had camped upon the crystal waters of Thompson Creek, naming it Rio Feliciana. The 
spot on which the college was built was never owned by France, as Mr. Horton, the 
owner of large tracts there, had purchased it from France. After the battle of New 
Orleans, General Jackson, with his Tennessee army, camped on the banks of the Rio 
Feliciana, and the citizens, in patriotic ardor, changed the name of their town from Bun- 
combe to Jackson. 

The state of Louisiana, in 1825, had founded a state college at Jackson. This 
college, however, had proved a failure, and it was this property that the Methodist con- 
ferences of Louisiana and Mississippi purchased in 1845, when Centenary College was 
moved. At Jackson, Centenary entered upon a brilliant career. During this period the 
college was well known throughout the South, nearly every family of prominence in the 
public life of the state being represented there. Indeed, the hrtory of this old pioneer 
college of the Southwest is commingled and interwoven as warp and woof with the history 
of the country, many of its alumni being men who have been distinguished in the affairs 
of the state, the South, and the nation. There is a tradition that Jeffer on Davis took a 
special course in Spanish at Centenary, and it is certain that Judah P. Benjamin, secre- 
tary of state in the Southern Confederacy, was a student in its halls. Charles Parlange, 
lieutenant-governor of the state, and C. J. Boatner, a brilliant lawyer and member of 
congress, were both students at this school; also E. John ElHs, Unitel States senator and 
a national figure in his day. Judge Ben Spencer was an alumnus of old Centenary, and 
while at school there wrote many of his famous speeches. Judge J. C. McVea and 
Judge Charles McVea, distinguished jurists; Dr. C. W. Carter, one of the brainiest 
men the Methodist Church ever produced; Dr. L. C. Perkins, Judge Anthony Sambola, 
Dr. Whyte G. Owen, Judge Charles Kilbourne, Judge George Wcodside, the Fullilove 
brothers, Amos J. Ponder, Judge A. J. Murff, and the Pharr brothers all received their 
degrees from old Centenary. The Holcombe brothers, too — A. R. and W. P., now 
located in New York, one a writer on a big New York daily, the other a prominent 
electrical engineer — graduated at Centenary. Members of the recent constitutional con- 
vention who could call Centenary their Alma Mater were Paul G. Barron, Charles 



Page ten 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Holcombe, E. A. Pharr, and O. H. Simpson, the latter being secretary of both State 
Senate and constitutional convention. A list of the prominent Methodist ministers of the 
state includes these from Centenary: N. E. Joyner, R. N. Harper, R. H. Wynn, 
C. C. Miller, A. S. Lutz, S. J. Davies, P. M. Brown, and others too numerous 
to mention. 

As all Southern institutions did, Centenary suffered from the hardships of the Civil 
War and the poverty of the reconstruction days. Collegiate work was almost entirely 
suspended, there being no graduates from 1861 to 1868. During the war a company 
of soldiers was organized from the student body of the school, and most of these young 
lives were laid down in behalf of the state and the South they loved so well. The build- 
ings were for a time used as a hospital base for the Confederates at Port Hudson, and 




were later occupied by the Federals. Back of these old buildings, under the spreading 
branches of great beeches, there was a Confederate graveyard. During the reconstruc- 
tion period Centenary College had a struggle for its very existence, and its salvation 
was due largely to the personal work of Bishop Keener, who secured money to tide it 
over the crisis. After Centenary had successfully weathered this period, it began again 
its great work, maintaining a place of commanding influence in both Louisiana and 
Mississippi. 

In 1 892 Millsaps College opened its doors in Jackson, Miss. With the loss of sup- 
port and changed conditions, it soon became evident that it would be impossible for the 
church of Louisiana to permanently maintain Centenary in Jackson, though excellent 
work was done there until the doors were closed in 1905. The previous year the Shreve- 
port Progressive League had made a proposition to the Louisiana Methodist Conference 



Page eleven 



to move Centenary College to Shreveport. Negotiations were conducted, and Mr. J. W. 
Atkins' offer of forty acres of land in Gladstone Heights was accepted. Work was 
begun immediately, and the doors of the college were again opened in the fall of 1908. 

The first president of the institution in Shreveport was Dr. W. L. Weber of Georgia, 
under whom gratifying progress was made. Dr. Weber was succeeded by Dr. Felix R. 
Hill, who served until his death in 1918. Dr. R. H. Wynn was elected to fill the 
vacancy. During his administration the college passed through another difficult period, 
but he succeeded in interesting the people and led an endowment campaign which was 
successful for the amount asked — $50,000. Dr. Wynn resigned the presidency in 1919, 
and Dr. William R. Bourne was elected. Under his leadership a program of expansion 
and construction was begun. At the beginning of his second year Dr. Bourne was 
released at the earnest solicitation of the director-general of the educational campaign 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, to assist in the larger work of organizing the 
alumni of various colleges. He resigned in January, 1921, and was succeeded by the 
present incumbent, Dr. George S. Sexton. Under Dr. Sexton's wise leadership Centenary 
College has already made most remarkable progress. With such a man, who has already 
proved himself a natural leader, at its head, and with the increased endowment through 
the educational campaigns of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and through the 
munificence of the General Education Board of New York City, the future and perma- 
nent usefulness of the institution is assured. 

The history of Centenary would be incomplete without something of the library. It 
contains over three thousand volumes of both ancient and modern literature. There are 
books of science, history, philosophy and literature that date back into the past centuries, 
there being a few old editions of 1680 and hundreds of others of the early part of the 
eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Also among the priceless possessions are huge folios 
of rare engravings of Shakespearean literature. In their day these folios were worth 
thousands of dollars, and today, as there is no longer another such copy extant in 
America, no estimate can be made of their value. These folios are an American edition 
from the original copper plates of "Boydell's Illustrations of Shakespeare," which was 
a collection of steel engravings from sixty-seven painters of the eighteenth and early nine- 
teenth centuries. England put out an edition of these folios by an act of appropriation 
of parliament, but as this appropriation was not large enough, the edition was inferior to 
the one put out in America. The original plates were brought over from England in 
1842, and the American edition was brought out in 1848 under the signatures of Wash- 
ington Irving, Audubon (naturalist and artist), John Van Buren (later president), 
Robert Morris, Horace Greeley (editor), Harper and Brothers, James W. Gerard, 
S. F. B. Morse (inventor), Wm. C. Bryant (poet), Alexander H. Stevens (M.D.). 
and about twenty other famous Americans. There are enough of these folios to have a 
Shakespearean gallery, which is soon to be constructed. When this gallery is completed 
it will be the only one of its kind in America. In addition to these, there is a collection 
of hand-colored prints of all the Indian tribes of America, and some excellent prints of 



Page twelve 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




the matchless Audubon drawings. In Centenary's library is also to be found a polyglot 
Bible, which contains the whole Bible in Hebrew, Greek, Latin, French, Spanish, Italian, 
Gaelic, and English. While at various times in her history Centenary College has been 
greatly in need of money and the value of this old library would have tided it over many 
a crisis, it has been preserved for the classic old institution, Centenary College of 
Louisiana. 

The presidents who have served at Centenary from 1841 are: Rev. T. C. Thorn- 
ton, D.D.; David O. Shatuck; Judge A. B. Longstieet, LL.D.; Rev. R. H. Rivers, 
D.D.; Rev. B. M. Drake, D.D.; Rev. John C. M : ller; Rev. W. H. Watkins; Rev. 
C. G. Andrews, D.D.; Rev. D. M. Rush; Dr. T. A. S. Adams; George H. Wiley; 
Dr. W. L. C. Hunnicut; Dr. C. W. Carter; Dr. I. W. 
Rev. C. C. Miller; Dr. W. L. Weber; Dr. Felix R. Hill; 
Dr. W. R. Bourne, and Dr. George S. Sexton. 

Much could be said of those who have taken part in the building of Centenary and 
tho:e who are still lending a helping hand, but Centenary Co'lege, which stands for such 
high degrees of morals and righteousness, is a fitting reward for their tireless efforts. 

Mattie Adelle McClenaghan. 



Cooper; Dr. H. B. Carre; 
; Rev. R. H. Wynn, D.D. ; 




Page thirteen 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Centenary 

By James Church Alvord 



Where the sleepy silver bayou 
Gleams among the pines, 

Watching o'er the throbbing city, 
Alma Mater shines. 



Chorus 
Forward, forward. Centenary! 

Time and tide may fail, 
But our hearts shall love thee ever. 

Centenary — Hail ! 



Like a wave the mighty city 

Surges 'round thy feet. 
Guide it, train it, teach it wisdom, 

Alma Mater, sweet. 



Chorus 
Green the boughs that rustle 'round thee 

On thy stately crest; 
Greener is our memory of thee, 

Alma Mater, blest. 

Chorus 



Page fourteen 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




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George S. Sexton, D.D. . . 
Robert E. Smith, A.M., B.D. 
George M. Reynolds, A.B. . 



President 

. Dean 

Secretary 



Iredell M. Clark Bursar 

Mrs. Ernest L. McCain .... Librarian 
Geo. P. Evans, B.S. . Headmaster of Academy 



Page fifteen 



YONCOPIN, 1922 












Faculty 



George S. Sexton 
D.D. 

President 



Pierce Cline 
Ph.B., a.m. 

Professor of History 

Emory University; Graduate Student at Columbia 
and Chicago Universities; President of R. E. Lee 
Institute; Professor of History and Economics, Bir- 
mingham-Southern College. 



Laura B. Bishop 
B.S., A.B., A.M. 

Professor of English 
Valparaiso University; Columbia University. 



Page sixteen 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




acuity 



James Church Alvord 
B.D., A.M. 

Professor of Modern Languages 

Williams College; Andova Theological Seminary; 
Emerson School of Oratory; Dr. Rosenthal's Lan- 
guage School; The Birletz School of Languages; 
School of French Conversation (Paris) ; University 
of Rome (Italy). 



Roy Moore 
B.D., A.M. 

Professor of Ancient Languages 

Vanderbilt University; Graduate Student of 
Columbia. 



Robert J. Kelly 
B.S. 

Professor of Science 

Meridian Male College; Ruskin Cave College; Pea- 
body College; University of Chicago. 




Page seventeen 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





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Faculty 



Daniel B. Raulins 
B.S., A.B. 

Professor of Education 
Ruskin Cave College. 



Roy R. Risk 
B.s. 

Professor of Science and Mathematics 
Indiana Normal. 



George M. Reynolds 
A.B. 

Associate Professor of Science and Laboratory 
Demonstrator 

Hendrix College; Graduate Student at Columbia 
and Chicago Universities. 



Page eighteen 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Faculty 



George P. Evans 
B.S. 

Headmaster of Academy 

Vanderbilt University; Graduate Student at Chi- 
cago University; Soldier Student, Oxford (Eng- 
land). 



Lee B. Hebert 
B.S. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics, Academy 
Millsaps College. 



Elmer V. Levie 
A.B. 

Professor of History, Academy 

Emory University; Student at University of Georgia; 
Student at University of London, England; Grad- 
uate Student at University of Chicago. 



., 




IimJu: • 



Page nineteen 




Faculty 



Mrs. R. E. Smith 

A.B., B.Mus. 
Mathematics, Academy 
Ruskin Cave College. 



James R. Jackson 
B.Ped. 

Headmaster of Commercial Department 

Missouri State Teachers' College; Gem City Busi- 
ness College; Special Work, University of Ohio; 
University of Chicago; Vice-President and Cashier, 
First Slate Bank, Ft. Worth, Texas; Aerial Ob- 
server, Air Service, U. S. Army, rank of Lieu- 
tenant. 



Mrs. James R. Jackson 

Teacher of Shorthand 

Marion Normal Institute; Macormick Business 
School. 



Page twenty 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Faculty 



George S. Sexton, Jr. 

Instructor in Argumentation 
Southern Methodist University. 



Stella E. Steele 
A.B., B.S., MA. 

Dietitian 
Missouri University; Columbia University. 



Amanda H. McDonald 

Secretary to th; President 
University of Texas. 




Page tloent\)-one 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Faculty 



Mrs. Ernest L. McCau 

Librarian 



Mr. Irdell M. Clark 

Bursar 



Page twenty -imo 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




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Page twenty-three 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Senior Class 

Motto : "Nil Desperandum" 
Colors: Purple and Gold Flower: Thislle 

Officers 

W. C. HoNEYCUTT President 

W. C. Mitchell Vice-President 

Velva Clark Secretary 

R. K. Nelson Treasurer 

R. L. Armstrong Historian 

B. C. Taylor Poet 



Page twenty-four 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Senior Class History 



OUR years ago the Class of 1922 came to Centenary and begin the journey toward the 
goal that we have reached today. We believe that we have achieved a degree of 
success that will inspire us on to greater achievements. 

As freshmen our path was darkened by two external event;. Quile a few were 
called from our class to military service during the great war. Some of this number 
paid the supreme sacrifice. It was during this year that the influenza plague swept over 
our country, and because of the gaps made by this scourge our ranks were weakened. 
But after being daikened by these two events our path was brightened by one of the 
greatest victories ever known to a naticn of people — that cf the defeat of Germany. 
We are saddened because of those in our class who could not return to our class from 
this conflict, but we are proud of the fact that we were represented on that greatest bat'lefield in the 
world's histcry. Aside from these external influences that left their impress upon us, there were the 
usual discouragements that come lo the freehman. But the very fact that we had these things to confront 
us made us the more determined to go higher in literary endeavor. We said among ourcelves, "We like 
to be freshmen, but we want to show those sophs that we can be sophs, too." 

As sophs we were small in number, but we had grit and courage. Then it was that we began lo 
feel our impoitance. It fell our lot to lay down the rul;s to the freshies and mak? those juniors watch 
their step. 

As juniors we continued to make the most of our opportunities. As seniors we gained in individual 
prestige what we lost in mere numbers. 

Our stay at dear old Centenary seems to have passed loo hurriedly. We sometimes wish that we 
could live again these four years. The memory of those thing; that once seemed drudgery is the fondest 
of our pleasures now. The midnight hours that were spent in study were pleasant hours after all. Oh, 
that we only knew that all life's journey would be as smooth traveling as that portion over which we 
have just traveled! May we always be engaged in those pursuits that will bring us much gladness with 
as little toil as those pursuits that have occupied our attention during our college course. Beyond a 
doubt the happiest days in any of our lives have been spent within the walls and around the campus 
of our dear old Alma Mater. 

It would be extremely difficult lo mention the occasion; that were of greatest interest to us. There 
are the socials and weekly programs given by the Union Literary Society. The memory of the contests 
on the athletic field will doubtless linger' for a time in our minds. Not a few are the conflicts in which 
we fought courageously for our Alma Mater. We believe that the participation in ihese athletic activities 
has a certain quality within us that would not have entered our lives through any other avenue. 

The memory of each member of ihe faculty is dear to our hearts. Whatever we achieve in life 
will be due largely to the principles of high and holy living that were instilled in our hearts by them. 
Our words refuse to express our feeling toward them. We have purposed in our hearts that we will 
live such lives as will reflect honor upon those who were our patient instructors in college. 

There is one name that is revered by us — the name of one who was a sharer of our every joy and 
every sorrow. His advice was always final with us. When a problem confronted us that was loo 
difficult for us to solve, in him we could confide. He understood us, cheered us up, fathered us, and 
always held the highest ideals before us. This was Dr. Smith. 

We have reached the height that has been before us for a long time. But today we do not look 
upon that height in the same light that we once looked upon it. We no longer look upon it as the 
summit of life's mountain side, but merely a step toward that summit. We feel that we are now betler 
able to climb to that mountain top. We believe that our task has been faithfully performed, because 
we are more eager to climb today than at any time in our past history. 



Page in>enty-five 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Senior Class 



R. Larence Armstrong, B.A. 
Belmont, La. 

Football Team, '19, '20, '21; Baseball Team, 
'19, '20, '21, '22; President Union Literary So- 
ciety, '21, '22; Historian Senior Class, '22. 

"He had the symptoms of the great. 
The arrogant assuming." 



Velva Irene Clark, B.A. 
Shreveport, La. 

Choral Club of Southwestern "University, '17, 
'18, '19, '20; Accompanist of S. U., '20; Theory 
S. U., '19, '20; Assistant Secretary Union Lit- 
erary Society, '22; Secretary Senior Class, '22. 

"She is just the srveet, quiet kind, meel( and 

mud, whose seducing smile no man can 

resist — not even a professor." 



William C. Honeycutt, B.A. 
Shreveport, La. 

Football Team, '08, '09, '13; Basketball Team, 
'09; Manager Baseball Team, '10; Manager Bas- 
ketball Team, '13; Winner Hutchinson Medal, 
'It; President Union Literary Society. '21; 
President Senior Class, '22. 

"He mas a pore, benighted heathen, 
But a first-class talking man." 



Page llDenly-six 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Senior CI 



ass 



Walter C. Mitchell, B.S. 
Shreveport, La. 

Varsity Baseball Team, '20, "21; Athletic Editor 
Maroon and White; Pre-Med Society; Vice- 
President Senior Class. 

"Wiry, fiery, twentieth century philosopher ; 
As just a man as e'er we met." 



Ragan K. Nelson, B.S. 
Houghton, La. 

Baseball, '20, '21; Editor-in-Chief of Yoncopin, 
'22; Y. M. C. A. Ex-Service Club, '22; Pre-Med 
Society. '21, '22; Treasurer of Senior Class, '22. 

"Yon Nelson has a mystic sph':nx-lil(e lool(. W ho 
is he going to Wor}( next?" 



Byron C. Taylor, B.A. 
Dresden, Tenn. 

Winner of Intersociety Medal, '20; Class Poet; 
Editor-in-Chief of Maroon and White. 

"He wears the face of a prince of righteousness 
With the shape of a crowbar." 



Iltlillllimi 




Page twenty-seven 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




CI 



ass 



oem 



First we name the spinner "Army," 

The favorite son of his own mamma; 

He spins in the literary world, 
Especially on poetic drama. 



Then comes the co-ed spinner, 
Who always does her part; 

But, my! boys, she's a terror — 

When she spins the masculine hearts. 



Ah, the Honeycutt spinner is next- 
He's alwa,ys on the run, 

Spinning the same old yarn 

As other fellows have done. 



Nelson, the Dr. Spinner, 

Gives his patients a chill 
When they view him in the distance. 
Spinning the black-draught pills. 



Here's the spinner "Pete," 
Who's ever on the go; 

Spinning, talking and spinning, 
Rivaling the great Pluto. 



Last comes the Taylor spinner. 

With warnings brave and bold. 

Spinning the old-time gospel 

With accents strong and cold. 



If you don't know the spinners. 

Just turn to the Senior Cartoon; 
There you will see the spinners at work, 
Early, late and soon. 



Page ll»enl\)-eighl 



YONCOPIN, 1922 







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YONCOPIN, 1922 




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YONCOPIN, 1922 4 





Officers 

W. B. Glover President 

Bernice Phipps Vice-President 

WYETH WORLEY Secretary 

Mattie Adelle McClenaghan Reporter 



Page thirty-one 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Junior Class 
Elizabeth Burgess Shreveport, La. 

CANDIDATE FOR B.A. DEGREE 

Associate Editor Yoncopin, '22; Vice-President Dramatic Club, '22; Assistant 
Chairman of Social Committee, '22. 

Mattie Adelle McCLENAGHAN Shreveport, La. 

CANDIDATE FOR B.A. DEGREE 

Local Editor of Booster, '20; Secretary of Student Association, '21; Local Editor 
of Maroon and White, '21; Member of Student Faculty Committee, '21; Associate 
Editor Maroon and White, '22; Associate Editor of Yoncopin, '22; Reporter of 
Junior Class, '22. 

William B. Glover Shreveport, La. 

CANDIDATE FOR B.S. DEGREE 

Football Team, '19; President Athletic Association, '19; President Student Asso- 
ciation, '22; President of Union Literary Society, '22; President of Junior Class, '22. 

George M. Pattison Mitchell, La. 

CANDIDATE FOR B.S. DEGREE 

Football Team, '19, '20, '21; Captain of Football Team, '21; Captain of Basket- 
ball Team, '21; Captain of Baseball Team, '21; Member of Union Literary Society, 
'21, '22; Pre-Med Society, '22. 

Alton L. Keoun Plain Dealing, La. 

CANDIDATE FOR B.S. DEGREE 

Member of Union Literary Society, '22. 



Page thirty-two 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Junior Class 

MARY BERNICE PHIPPS Shreveport, La. 

CANDIDATE FOR B.A. DEGREE 

Secretary of Union Literary Society, '20; Vice-President of Junior Class, '22. 

GEORGE D. PuRCELL South Mansfield, La. 

CANDIDATE FOR B.S. DEGREE 

Member of Union Literary Society, '22. 

George P. QuiNN Shreveport, La. 

CANDIDATE FOR B.S. DEGREE 

Cheer Leader, '22; Member of Union Literary Society, '22; Pre-Med Society, '22; 
Glee Club, '22. 

Clarence L. Tucker Haughton, La. 

CANDIDATE FOR B.S. DEGREE 

Football Team, Louisiana College, '20, '21; Baseball Team, Louisiana College, 
'20, '21; Basketball Team, Louisiana College, '20, '21. 

WYETH B. WORLEY Gilliam, La. 

CANDIDATE FOR B.S. DEGREE 

Basketball Team, '20; Baseball Team, '20; Football Team, '20, '21; Athletic Editor 
Yoncopin, '22; Member of Union Literary Society; Pre-Med Society; Secretary of 
Junior Class, '22. 



Page thirty-three 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




The Student s Soliloquy 

(Apologies lo Shakespeare) 

To study or not to study, that is the question. 

Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer 

The fatigues and toils of outrageous study, 

Or to defy the order of the prof.. 

And by cutting class end it all? To cut; 

To study no more; and by cutting to say we end 

The class and a thousand natural shocks 

The student is subject to. To cut, to study no more; 

Perchance to fail — aye, there's the rub. 

For on that report what grades may come. 

When we have flunked the term exam, 

Must give us pause; there's the respect 

That makes our cutting class of so short life, 

For who would bear the tortures of study, 

The prof's frown, the hours of labor. 

The pangs of studying, pleasures delayed 

For five little demerits? Who would these book; read. 

To grunt and sweat for the sake of learning; 

But that the dread of something at the term's end. 

That awful exam through which 

No cutter of classes passes, puzzles the will ; 

And makes us rather bear those ills we have 

Than fly to others that we know not of? 

Thus the prof, doth make cowards of us all; 

And thus the native hue of resolution 

Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of fear. 

And many a one whose inclination is to cut 

With this regard, he sta,ys in study hall, 

Bending over the book. 

Mattie Adelle McClenaghan. 



Page ihirty-four 



4 A 

A YONCOPIN, 1922 % 



"IT 



Ip^ 




Page ihirly-five 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Soph 



omore 



ass 



Officers 

Ervin J. LeBlanc President 

LOUISE LlDE Vice-President 

Helen Richardson Secretary 

Yetta Velinsky Treasurer 



Members 



Roy Akin 
Isaac Abramson 
D. B. Binford 
Sidney Lee Conger 
David Eastbourne 
Randa'l Harlow 



Virginia Harrell 
Ervin Le Blanc 
Louise Lide 
Helen Richardson 
Yetta Velinsky 
Eugene W. Williamso* 



Page thirty-six 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Page thirty-seven 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




I Wonder 



A thousand eons from this New Year 
I wonder where we'll be? 

I wonder if we'll be like monkeys. 
Skinning up a tree? 



I wonder if we'll fly through air 

By means of some contraption? 
I wonder if we'll have to eat 
Through contra-extradaption? 



I wonder if in summer time 
We'll live in thermo flals, 

And if in winter our ears get cold 
We'll have steam-heated hats? 



I wonder if we'll study ezoks 

And X Y Z's and amagys? 
I wonder if we'll finish school 
At ten and not be prodigies? 



I wonder how long skirts will be, 

If ears will be in style? 
Or if we'll slick our hair back straight 
And have trains for most a mile? 



I wonder, wonder, wonder! 

Yes, I'm curious as can be. 
I'd like to sleep a thousand years 

And then wake up and see. 

Mary Virginia Harrell. 



Page ihirty-eighi 




Page thirty-nine 



Color: Green 



Freshman Class 

Mollo: "Not on the heights, but climbing' 



Flower: Sunflower 



Officers 

Edmond M. Thrash, Jr President 

Emilie Barnes Vice-President 

A. Claude Hoffpauir Secretary and Treasurer 

J. B. Kent Reporter 

John Preston , . . Sergeant-al-Arms 



Eloise Adams 
James W. E. Airey 
Edgar Alford 
Chas. M. Bannerman 
Chris T. Barnette 
Emilie Barnes 
Warren Beckcom 
Warren Beckom 
W. Stith Bynum 
F. C. Cady 
John T. Carpenter 
Mary Ella Carleton 
Byrnie Cason 
Sallie Mat Clingman 
George H. Corry 
John L. Dowlll 
Robert N. Dowling 



Class Roll 

Margaret E. Dunlap 
Chase Faulk 
Harry P. Fisher 
Buck Fletcher 
Bessie Bee Gardner 
R. W. Godbold 
FIardin T. Griffin, Jr. 
Albert Harper 
James Harris 
John Lewis Henry 
J. V. Hendricks 
A. Claude Hoffpauir 
Robert P. Howell 
Walter A. Hynum 
H. W. Jordan 
J. B. Kent 



Lloyd McDade 
C. A. McGhee 
Oswald L. Parker 
Will H. Phillips 
John Preston 
James Pruet 
John Purnell 
Robert H. Read 
Ralph H. Riggs 
A. C. Skannal, Jr. 
Angus Snell 
James A. Thompson 
Edmond M. Thrash, Jr. 
Robert Walton 
Sallie Walters 
Aubrey H. Y'Blood 



Page forty 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Page fcrly-one. 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





ANNE. 0N > rAOuSE 



Velva Clark 
Bernice Phipps 
Mattie A. McClenaghan 
Elizabeth Burgess 



Louise Lide 
Yetta Velinsky 
Vircinia Harrel 
Sallie M. Clingman 



Margaret Dunlap 
Sallie Walters 
Mary E. Carleton 
Byrnie Cason 



Bessie Gardner 
Emilie Barnes 
Delia Munday 
Eloise Adams 
Helen Richardson 



Page foriy-tivo 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Page forty-three 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Familiar Sayings 

Dr. Sexton "We'll put it over" 

Dean Smith "Stay off that forbidden honey" 

Mr. Cline ¥i**|i* 

Mr. Alvord "Bonjourmonsieurmadamoiselle, bonjour!" 

Mr. Raulins . . . "One of my students has lost his book. I hope everyone who 

finds it will return it." 

Miss Bishop "Oh, for pity sake! 

Mr. Moore "Aw, Quinn! 

Mr. Reynolds "My goodness, Josephine! 

Mr. Levie "Of course, you might say 

Mr. Hebert "I have an announcement to make about the tickets 

Coach Norton "Great balls of snow! 

B. C. Taylor "That's a point against you 

ELOISE "Just for that I'll exterminate you 

Helen "Just say that again, just say that again 

Bob "Great holy shades of Hades! 

LOUISE "Judas preached 

Pete "Oh, boy! 

QuiNN "I'll knock him for a goal 

JOHN P "Bah Jove! 



Page forl'j-four 




Page forty-five 




YONCOPIN, 1922 



HMiiiiiiiiitiiiipsfiffiiirs pi^s^^a 




Uncle Phil 




REMEMBER well when I was only a little girl in p na fores and lived on 
the plantation in a big colonial house. The house was almost hidden, so 
thickly grew the masses- of tall and stately evergreens and shrubbery and the 
oaks which bordered the long, winding driveway. Even to this day the 
odor of magnolia and lilacs awakes in my memory the good times I had 
playing hide-and-seek and making doll houses under those shady boughs. 
The face of old Aunt Susan, my black mammy, who watched over me in 
those early years, is often before me; but the cne colored person on the 
whole plantation who meant most to me was Uncle Phil. 

Grandfather often took me with him up on his horse as he rode through 
the fields of cotton to see how the crops were maturing. He kept his arms around me 
while I sat in front of him, holding on tight to the saddle. And I always begged him to 
stop by Uncle Phil's before we went home. One Sunday afternoon, when I was about 
seven, just as we were leaving the table, grandfather whispered to me: "Run get your 
hat and meet me down at the stables.'' As we were pals, I never needed a second invita- 
tion, and, joining him a little later, we rode away on his fine Kentucky thoroughbred, 
Lexington. 

The fields were white with ripening cotton, acre after acre looked just as if it had 
been snowed under the night before. After we had ridden several miles we could see 
the chimney of Uncle Phil's log cabin in the distance. I said at once: "Grandfather, 
please take me by Uncle Phil's for just a little while." 

"All right," said grandfather. "Did I ever show you where Uncle Phil's master and 
mistress lived in the days before the Civil War?" 

"No, grandfather; where is it?" 

"It's just about half a mile through these pines. There's not much left to show you 
where the house stood — just piles of brick here and there — but I want to take you to 
the spot." 

And as we rode over the carpet of brown needles he talked of Jacob Smith and his 
wife, Chatsy, and their lovely home, which had been the scene of so much revelry and 
mirth before the war. The home, being situated about halfway between the settlements 
of Keachie and Greenwood, was the center of gayety for the young people. Just before 
grandfather bought the plantation the house had been torn down. The windows and 
doors were of solid walnut, imported from France hand-carved in a design of vines and 
flowers. These were used in the new home then being built by John Hall at Keatchie, a 
little town ten miles distant. In a grove of oaks just below the spot where the house had 
been we saw the tombstones of Jacob and Chatsy, now fallen and overgrown with mosses. 

Nearing Uncle Phil's, we found the dear old man down in the corn field. "If dat's 
not the little missus done come to see old Phil! Honey, I shore is glad to see you dis 
evenin." "How are you feeling. Uncle Phil?" I asked. 

"Your Uncle Phil am not very spry no more, child. I had the rumatiz so bad last 
night never slept a wink till I used some of dat leniment your gran'pa gimme. Laws, 



Page fort\)-six 




YONCOPIN, 1922 



massa, I thought I never would find dat stuff to go on my laig! I got up and struck a 
match and it went out, and I fumbled all around my cabin trying to find nutter one." 

"Did you find it, Uncle Phil?" 

"No, honey, if I hadn't kivered up a coal o' fire in de ashes I never would er struck 
a light with dat fat piece er kindlin' I alius keeps handy." 

As we talked we came up to his little house, around which he had planted jonquils, 
narcissus and old-fashioned princess feathers. I can see him now, as we talked there in 
the tiny yard, gathering flowers. Uncle Phil was not very tall, but he was well propor- 
tioned; he had the blackest face I ever saw — it really shone like ebony. His eyes were 
a piercing brown, with ever a merry twinkle of mischief and good humor. His white hair, 
uncut, stood out all around his head like a fuzzy ball of cotton. Looking up at him, I 
asked: "How old are you, Uncle Phil?" 

"Why, honey, I wuz nineteen years old when de stars fell, and dat's been a m:ghty 
long time ago." 

At this time everyone thought he could not possibly live longer than a few years, but 
each spring found him as interested as ever in his flowers and making his small crop with 
his old horse, Ebenezer. Ebenezer had only a wisp of a tail and was so thin that every 
rib could be counted. 

Every fall Uncle Phil took great delight in bringing his white folks the very first 
sweet potatoes. Coming up the walk with his double sack hung over his shoulder, he 
would call out: "Little miss, come here! Just see these nice tat?rs I brought you!" 

"Oh, I didn't know they were ripe yet, Uncle Phil. Aren't they early this year?" 

"Yes, dey's early, but dat's 'cause I g.ve'm plenty a-wurkin'." 

Opening the sack, I cried out, "What great big ones!" 

"Now run tell Aunt Mandy to git dem hambones fo' me." The hambones were 
always saved for Uncle Phil, and he knew that whenever he came they would be ready 
for him. 

The time came when Uncle Phil could not make a crop. Somehow, in the early 
spring, he found the strength to plant a little corn, but as he was not able to work it, it 
grew up tall and spindling. It did not make corn, only a little fodder. Then he would 
ride over to the commissary for his provisions, and everything he asked for would be 
given him. 

Uncle Phil was naturally very religious and was much disturbed because the crew 
on the oil well that was being drilled near his home worked on the Sabbath day. He 
told them: "You-all hed better watch out, for the ole bad man is shore comin' up dat 
hole some night an' git the last one ov yer." 

Last summer dear old Uncle Phil passed away. It was a privilege to have known 
him, and he will always be remembered for his cheerful words and loving deeds of 
kindness. 

Delia Munday. 



Page forly-scven 



Playing the Game 



If you ever feel sad and lonesome. 

If the world seems dreary and blue, 
If your last friend leaves you forever, 

And no one is thinking of you, 
Just throw up your head and smile on, boy; 

The world's full of struggle and strife, 
And you've got to play single-handed 

If you sit in the game of life. 

If you ever stand out on the corner 

In the drizzling rain and sleet, 
With never a cent in your pocket 

And nothing at all to eat, 
Just tighten your belt and fight back, boy; 

If you can't get a club, use a knife. 
For you'll find that the odds are heavy 

When you're playing the game of life. 



But if ever you come out on top, boy, 

And fate starts dealing you trumps. 
Remember that someone is losing. 

And help him along when he slumps. 
Don't tilt back your chair and be selfish; 

Remember that trouble is rife, 
And a real man's kind to the losers, 

If he wins in the game of life. 

John Purnell. 



Pcge forly-eighi 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Sound Mind — Sound Body 




ENTENARY COLLEGE just at present is laying more emphasis on the 
training of the body than ever before. The college has secured "Bo" 
McMillin, and that has emphasized sports in such a way that Centenary 
College, nine months ago an unknown institution, has now a name heralded 
from one end of the United States to the other. There has been some fear 
expressed that Centenary might stand merely for athletic?. There need be 
no fear. Physical education is not enough emphasized in America. Look 
at a group of business men ; see how fat and flabby they are. Their mus- 
cles, as well as their energies, are wasted, and a large number die annually 
for the lack of exercise. There are only two living ex-Presidents in the 
United States, one a physical wreck, and the other, alarmed by his excessive weight, 
began a few years ago to take daily exercises and to walk four miles every day that he 
might be a stronger man. The magazines are full of pictures of Mr. Taft before and 
after he took physical training; before, the obese President, and after, the man well built 
and strong. 

When we look at our own college men we are impressed with the need of physical 
exercise. They get stale, and then spoil in some soft lounging place in the college. These 
men are not leaving their "footprints on the sands of time"; they are pressed gently upon 
the soil and tasks of the day, and then blown away by the light winds. What these boys 
need is not only to study, not only religious instruction — they get that in chapel every 
morning — but they need to take care of the bodies which Gcd gave them. 

We look back at the Greeks. There has never existed a race of men of such high 
intellectual average as there did under Pericles. Three of the greatest tragedy writers 
that the world has ever known, the world's greatest comedy poets, the two most wonderful 
sculptors the world has so far produced, and Socrates and Plato, the two greatest philos- 
ophers in history, except Jesus Christ; all these lived together, passed each other on the 
streets, and toiled incessantly. We have the record of their bodies kept in deathless 
marble, and brilliant as were their minds, high in spiritual things as were their ideals, their 
bodies were every bit as remarkable as their brains or their souls. Every muscle was 
developed to the fullest extent. The body of Sophocles, preserved for us in a full-sized 
statue, is the model of what every American body should be; and as for the brains of 
Sophocles, no man living in the world today possesses its like. 

Like Greece of ancient days, America is beginning to realize that the fine arts must 
come after a strong, robust manhood has been developed. At Centenary College today 
we, in our own way, are attempting to fall in line with this new movement for better 
bodies — better bodies not as an end but as a means to the greater end of greater minds 
and greater souls, 

N. 



Page forty-nine 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




THE MAROON AND WHITE 



I'^blMmcl Weekly by the 



SHBEVEPORT, LA., FRIDAY, nil EMBER J, 192] 



The Maroon and White 



Centenary Students 



%= "^ George Pattison, Captain of the Maroon and White E 









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Page fifty 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Maroon and White Staff 

B. C. Taylor Editor-in-Chief 

Helen Richardson Associate Editor 

Mattie Adelle McClENAGHAN Associate Editor 

James AlREY Managing Editor 

W. C. Mitchell Athletic Editor 

Luther Grounds Local Editor 

W. B. GLOVER Business Manager 

S. L. Conger Assistant Business Manager 

Louise Libe / £ c Editor 

John Allen Assistant Joke Editor 

Maurice Ellington Circulation Manager 

W. G Banks Assistant Circulation Manager 



Page fifty-one 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




ayIUm* x I 



THIS SHlPnCNT HPtS 
TO GO IN TOflOflflM.) 

/WO wf ««*" *w / " r 

BfHtrtO. 




Ragan K. NELSON Editor-in-Chief 

Elizabeth Burgess Associate Editor 

Mattie AdelLE McClenachan Associate Editor 

Edmond M. Thrash, Jr Business Manager 

SIDNEY Lee Conger Assistant Business Manager 

J. V. Hendrick Managing Editor 

Delia Munday Society Editor 

Wyeth Worley Athletic Editor 

Robert Read . Art Editor 

Eloise Adams Art Editor 

Louise Lide ]o\e Editor 

Miss Laura Bishop Faculty Adviser 

Bernice Phipps Typist 



Page fifty-livo 




Page fifty-three 




YONCOPIN, 1922 



Patterns 

(IVith Apologies to Amy Lowell) 



I walk down the new plank walk. 

And 'all the pine cones 

Have fallen, and the bright blue squills, 

Whatever they are, are blowing. 

A downy bird runs down a tree trunk, 

A woodpecker raps for silence. 

In my old brown shoes. 

With my cootie puffs, 

And my ruffs, 

I, loo, am a rare 

Pattern, as I walk down 

The new plank walk at Centenary. 



My dress is low-necked. 

And the train 

Is cut off at the knees. 

I make a figure long and thin 

On the gravel. 

Before I get to the college building. 

I am just a plate of current fashion, 

Tripping by in high-heeled shoes, 

Not a softness anywhere about me, 

Hard-boiled, 

And I sink on a seat 

On the porch of the college 

For my passion 

Wars against hard work. 

The grandstand 

Rises against the horizon. 

And the new-plowed earth 

Lies soaked in 

Hydrogen monoxide. 

Athletes and co-eds 

Flutter in the breeze 

As they please. 

And I weep; 

For the bell rings, 

And I must pull through another 

Recitation. 



I would be the pink and silver as I run along 

To class. 

And he would stumble after, 

Bewildered by m,y laughter; 

I should see the sun flashing from his head 

Piece 

And the buckles on his shoes. 

I would choose 

To lead him in a daze along the 

Patterned new board walk 

To the dining hall 

At noon. 

Ah, me! 



Page fifty-four 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




/OT 



w — 




Page fifty-five 



YONCOPIN, 1922 



sSsl 




Union Literary Society 



First Term 
W. B. Glover 
W. C. Honeycutt 
H. \V. Jordan 
G. H. Corry . . 
R. L. Armstrong 



Officers 

Second Term 

President Louise LlDE 

V ice- P resident R. L. Armstrong 

. Secretary CoTY RosENBLATH 

Treasurer G. H. Corry 

. . Critic W. C. HONEYCUTT 



Third Term 

R. L. Armstrong President 

G. M. Pattison Vice-President 

Velva Clark Secretary 

G. H. Corry Treasurer 

W. C. Honeycutt Critic 



Members 



R. L. Armstrong 
Emilie Barnes 
Warren Beckcom 
D. B. Binford 
Chris Barnette 
C. M. Bannerman 

F. C. Cady 

J. T. Carpenter 

G. H. Corry 
Byrnie Cason 
Velva Clark 

Mary Ella Carleton 
Robert Dowling 
David Eastbourne 
Maurice Ellington 
Bessie Gardner 
W. B. Glover 
Luther Grounds 
Hardin T. Griffin 
W. C. Honeycutt 
Randall FIarlow 



H. W. Jordan 

A. L. Keoun 
Louise Lide 

MattiE A. McClenaghan 
\V. C. Mitchell 
Delia Munday 
Lloyd McDade 
C. A. McGhee 
Racan Nelson- 
Oswald Parker 
Bernice Phipps 
George Pattison 
George Quinn 
R. H. Read 
Ralph Riggs 
Coty Rosenblath 

B. C. Taylor 
Sallie Walters 
W. B. Worley 

E. W. Williamson 
Yetta Velinsky 



Page fifty-six 



YONCOPIN, 1922 








Page fifty-seven 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Franklin Institute 



Officers 

First Term 

R. P. Howell, Jr President 

R. W. GoDBOLD Vice-President 

J. B. Kent Secretary-Treasurer 



Second Term 

A. H. Y'BLOOD President . . 

Chase Faulk. Vice-President 

Margaret Dunlap . . . Secretary-Treasurer 
J. B. Kent Reporter . . 



... J. B. Kent 
. . A. H. VBlood 
. Claude Hoffpauir 
. Margaret Dunlap 



Members 



Isaac Abramson 
James Airey * 

Edgar Alford 
John Allen 
Stith Bynum 
Alvin Carrington 
Sallie Mat Clingman 
Margaret Dunlap 
Chase Faulk 
r. w. godbold 
James Harris 
Louis Henry 



J. V. Hendrick 
Claude Hoffpauir 
Robert Howell, Jr. 
Walter Hynum 
J. B. Kent 
Francis Lawler 
Donald Levigne 
John Purnell 
James Pruet 
Helen Richardson 
Edmond Thrash 
Aubrey Y'Blood 



Page fifty-eight 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Pagz fifty-nine 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Y. M. C. A. 



Officers 

H. W. Jordan President 

Clyde Wafer Vice-President 

Coty Rosenblath Secretary 

Lloyd Townsend Treasurer 



Members 



Larry Armstrong 
Warren Beckcom 
John L. Dowell 
Robert Dowli.mc 
Paul C. Faulk 
Harry P. Fisher 
Orlene H. Fletcher 
Albert Harper 
James T. Harris 
Claude Hoffpauir 
Rocert P. Howell 
W. A. Hynum 
Henry Jordan 
J. B. Kent 
Alton Keoun 
Lamar Lowery 



Loye McDade 
C. A. McGhee 
Ragan K. Nelson 
Oswald Parker 
George M. Pattiso 
James Pierson 
J. H. Purnell 
R. H. Reed 
Coty Rosenblath 
W. A. Snell 
James Thompson 
Lloyd Townsend 
W. C. Wafer 
E. W. Williamson 
Wyeth Wcrley 
A. H. Y'Blood 



Page sixty 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Page sixty-one 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




College Band 



Officers 

Mr. A. S. Fowler 

Edgar Alford Librarian 



Instructor 



Members 

Isaac Abramson . Cornet 

Edcar Alford .... . . Cornel 

W. G. Banks ... Comet 

Edwin Moore ... . . . . Comet 

Cecil Henry .... Comet 

Leon Scales . Cornet 

A. H Y'Blood Cornet 

Billie Youncblood Cornel 

Tom Conger .Alto 

Robert Dowling ... Alio 

Tom Fullilove Alto 

R. W. Godbold Alto 

R. H. Harlow ... Alio 

Leon L. Booth . . . Slide Trombone 

L. B. Hebert . . Slide Trombone 

R. R. Risk . Slide Trombone 

C. L. Gamn . . .... Saxophone 

J. A. KENNEDY ... .... Saxophone 

H. M. YoUNGBLOOD . Saxophone 

Jack Fullilove Baritone 

J. W. Allen Clarinet 

Warren Beckom Clarinet 

Samford Fullilove Clarinet 

James Vaughan Clarinet 

Lloyd Clanton Bass Drum 

Gilliard Phillips , . Snare Drum 

L. D. WoRLEY ... . Snare Drum 

W. A. Hynum Cpmbals 

John Allen . .... Bass Horn 

E. J. LeBlanc . . .... Bass Horn 



Page sixty-two 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Page sixty- three 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Centenary Quartette 

Members 

B. C. Taylor Tenor 

R. W. Godbold . . Second Tenor 

L. B. Hebert .... Second Bass 

H. W. Jordan Bass 



Pi-ge sixty-four 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Ministerial Club 

Officers 



George H. Corrv 

J. E. King 

E. J. Buck 

Alton Carrington . . 

Dr. R. E. Smith 



President 

. Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

. Chaplain 
Governor 



Members 

R. L. Armstrong 

E. j. Buck 

F. C. Cady 
Alton Carrington 
L. O. Grounds 

H. W. Jordan 
J. E. King 
Dr. R. E. Smith 
B. C. Taylor 



Page sixty -five 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




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I 'iige sixty-six 




Ex-S 



ervice 



Club 



Members 



Larry Armstrong 
Harvey S. Arnold 
E. J. Buck 
Leslie Druit 
G. P. Evans 
W. B. Glover 
L. B. Hebert 
J. R. Jackson 



F. C. Cady 
E. V. Levie 

Haywood Manhein 
Racan K. Nelson 

Geo. M. Pattison 
Geo. Reynolds 

Coty Rosenblath 
Roy Risk 



Page sixly-seVen 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Delta Chi Dramatic Glut 

Officers 

JESSIE GARDNER President 

Elizabeth Burgess Vice-President 

Yetta Velinsky Secretary and Treasurer 



Eloise Adams 
Emilie Barnes 
Elizabeth Burgess 
Mary Ella Carleton 



Members 

Velva Clark 

Byrnie Cason 

Sallie Mat Clincman 

Margaret Dunlap 

Bessie Gardner 

Virginia Harrell 

Louij.e Lide 

Mattie A. McClenaghan 

Delia Munday 



Bernice Phipps 
Helen Richardson 
Yetta Velinsky 
Sallie Walters 



Page sixty-eight 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Page sixty-nine 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




i 



Alpka Kappa Pi 

Organized January 7, 1922, at Centenary Co 



John Dowell 
Sidney Lee Conger 
John Preston 



Members 

Loyd Townsend 
Henry Jordan 
*Jim Pruett 
*Jim Pearson 



Clyde Wafer 
Edmond Thrash 
J. V. Hendricks 



f Pled 



ges. 



Page seventy 



-■- 




Page seventy-one 




YONCOPIN, 1922 



Sigma Pki 



Charter Members 



w. c. honeycutt 
Lamar Lowery 
Loye McDade 
Ragan K. Nelson 



George M. Pattison 
Bob H. Reed 

COTY ROSENBLATH 

E. W. Williamson 



Wyeth Worley 



Freshmen (Pledges) 

D. B. BlNFORD 

R. L. Brown 
Robert Dowling 
Harry Fisher 
Albert Harper 
Alton Keoun 

E. J. LeBlanc 
C. A. McGhee 
A. H. Y'Bioop 



Page seventy- in> o 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Page seventy-three 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Pre-Med Society 
Officers 

George M. Pattison President 

R. K. Nelson Vice-President 

MARGARET DuNLAP Secretary and Treasurer 

E. J. LeBlanc Sergeant-al-Arms 

Members 

C. M Bannerman Marga:et Duni.ap J. V. Hendricks 

Claude Hoffpauir Miller Mims 

Robert P. Howell \V. C. Mitchell 

E. J. LeBlanc Racan K. Nelson 

G. M. Pattison 

George Quinn 

Ralph Riggs 

Wyeth Worley 



Page seventy)- four 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Pre-Law Society 



Officers 

Coty Rosenblath President 

Sidney L. Conger Vice-President 

David Eastbourne ... .... Secretary and Treasurer 



Harvey S. Arnold 

E. T. Barnett 

D. B. Binford 

Stith Bynum 

S. L. Conger 



Members 

David Eastbourne 
M. Ellington 
Albert Harper 
Coty Rosenblath 
E. M. Thrash 



E. W. Williamson 



Page seventy-five 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Fellowship 




INCE the beginning of the race, human relationships have been conducive 
to fellowship. In fact, the very nature of man's dealings with his neighbor 
has been such as to necessitate a certain degree of fellowship. The develop- 
ment of this spirit, this principle among men, has, of course, been slow, but 
it has been normal and steady. And from its infancy to its present complex 
state it has been a compelling force that has brought the day when all men 
everywhere are beginning to enjoy the benefits from brotherly relationships. 
Fellowship is a sane and beautiful working principle for all human 
relations, but it is possibly strongest felt as a binding force in religious faith. Our fellow- 
ship with God is stronger than love of parent or child, and, next to the family ties, the 
bond among men of the Christian church is closest. 

Furthermore, the spirit of good-will among men is found not only in the church, but, 
through the work of the organized church, it has permeated the whole civilized world. 
Christian fellowship has made business fellowship; has made professional fellowship; has 
made fellowship in the armies and navies of the world. It has even compelled a certain 
degree of good-will among opposing forces. In war a brave deed is applauded from the 
trenches of the enemy, as well as from the ranks of the hero's own men. 

The results from this fellowship, which in some degree is universal, cannot be esti- 
mated. Hand in hand with the progress of civilization, and, in fact, its chief aid, has 
been the spirit of good fellowship. It has facilitated better individual relationships, better 
group relationships, till today it would unite the nations of the earth in one spirit. It has 
brought the hope of annihilating war with "peace on earth." The Paris peace conference 
and the disarmament conference at Washington are convincing evidences that men are at 
last coming to realize the value of fellowship and a common purpose. 

This spirit is irresistible. No man or nation can long withstand the force of this 
movement, once its influence is felt. The time is near at hand when all men everywhere 
shall be united by the bonds of fellowship. When that time shall have come, men will 
behold the spirit of the Lord, the leaven that has worked the miracle of good-will to men. 

N. 



Page seventy-six 



6 A 

& YONCOPIN, 1922 6 



m 



m^i 



s©. 



ATHLETICS 




Pnge sevens-seven 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





MISS BESSIE GARDNER 
Sponsor 



Page seventy-eight 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Football Squad 



C. C. L. 

C. C. L. 

C. C. L. 

C. C. L. 

C. C. L. 

C. C. L. 

C. C. L. 



Games and Scores 



20; Atlanta High 17 

0: St. Charles 28 



0; L. S. N. 



7; Louisiana College 6 

34; Marshall 

21; Millsaps 7 

7; L. P. 1 14 



Page seventy-nine 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Football 



Coach Norton 

Not cnly the football men but the whole 
student body went wild when Dr. Sexton told 
us "Coach was coming back." He fulfilled 
our fondest expectation. He built a first-class 
fighting machine out of raw material, and he 
did it in one year. 



Coach Hebert 

A real coach, and it's only his first year. 
When he gets his stride his name will be men- 
tioned in the same breath as the greatest coaches 
of the country. Not only is he a first-class 
coach but a first-class scout. 



Capt. Pattison 

"Patt" has made All-State for the last three 
years, and there is not a Centenary man who 
does not thrill with pride at recollection of his 
brilliant playing. His generalship is of the 
highest quality. "Patt" is a born leader of 
men. 



Page eighty 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Football 



RESENBLATH, Center 

"Cotie" held down the center of the line. 
He was in every play that came his way, and 
was the steadiest and best snapperback that 
ever wore a Maroon and White uniform. 



McDADE, Left Tackle 

"Mac" was in every play with all his heart 
and soul, and many an opponent has wished 
that he had not been on Centenary's team. He 
is a steady and sure tackier. 



Wafer, Right Tackle 

"Half Pint" was the bulwark of strength 
on the right side of the line. His hobby was 
tearing through the opponents' line and breaking 
up the plays before they got started. All dur- 
ing the season he wrought havoc in the lines of 
the opposing teams. 




Page eighty-one 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Football 



BROWN, Quarterback 

Dugan at quarter is a splendid general and 
gets a hundred per cent cooperation from his 
comrades. His broken-field running ranks him 
as one of the best backs in the L. I. A. A. 



LOWERY, Quarter 

"Red" was a capable quarter, with a cate- 
gory of plays always on the end of his tongue. 
His punting pulled the Maroon and White out 
of many tight places. He was unable to finish 
the season on account of injuries sustained in 
the Pmeville game. 



HORTON, Halfback 

"Jimmie" is a hard worker and his spirit is 
admired by everyone. With very little experi- 
ence, he played his position splendidly. He 
rtlso played quarter and handled the team like 
a veteran. 



Page elght\)-lTvo 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Football 



Williamson, Right Guard 

"Willie" is quiet but aggressive. He holds 
like a steel wall on the defense, and his tackling 
has made him a terror to all his opponents. 



Le Blanc, Left Guard 

"Frenchie" is a fighter and was always full 
of pep. On the defensive he stood like a stone 
wall, and on the offensive there was always a 
hole where he was. 



MANHEIM, Left End 

Haywood was the first man down on the 
punts and always got his man. He broke up 
every play that came round his end. He was 
the hardest and surest tackier on the team. 




Page eighty-three 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Football 



Worley, Right End 

If "Red" missed a tackle this year nobody 
knows it. There was not a more faithful worker 
on the squad. His motto seems to be "Say 
nothing and saw wood." 



Preston, Fullback 

When a few yards were needed, Johnnie 
was sure to carry the ball through the line for 
a down, with several men hanging on him. His 
grit and determination, coupled with a powerful 
physique, made many opponents tremble. 



Harper, Left Half 

Albert's steady work around end and 
through the line made him invaluable to the 
team. He is fast, aggressive, and has that do- 
or-die spirit which helped to win many games 
for Centenary. 



Page eighty-four 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Football 



TOWNSEND, Fullback 

Loyd always played a splendid game when 
called on to fill any position in the backfield. 
With a little mere experience he will rank with 
the best in the state. 



Read, Halfback 

"Bob" is a hard worker. His tackling and 
end runs were good, and he has all the quali- 
ties of a wonderful football player. 



Armstrong, End 

"Keg" is a tall boy with hands built righl 
to snatch the most allusive passes from the air. 




Page eighty-five 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Football 



Bynum, End 

Stith was small, but made up for this handi- 
cap by his speed and accuracy in receiving 
passes. 



Hendrick, Tackle 

J. V. did not get to play in many games. 
But those he did play in he made a record for 
himself. 



Conger, Tackle 

"Sid" was light, but, oh, how he could down 
his man, and he gave the varsity many a hard 
knock. 



Page eighty-six 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





WHAT IS THE SCORE ? 



Page eighty-seven 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





BO McMILLIN 



Page eighty-eight 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





VELVA CLARK 
Basketball Sponsor 



Page eighty-nine 



Iffiiililifiin 



YONCOPIN, 1922 



^^^^iBffi^«^^^^^^'^lpiMRi^^^pii^^aimi^^^^) 




H. H. Norton, Coach 



O. H. Fletcher, Captain 



Basketball 

O. H. Fletcher Left Forward 

W. O. Townsend Right Forward 

W. C. Wafer Center 

R. L. Armstrong ... Left Guard 

J. F. PlERSON Right Guard 

J. A. HORTON ... Guard 

J. S. Preston Guard 

J. L. Helm Forward 

H. C. Rosenblath ... Guard 



Page nine!]) 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Basketball Squad 

Centenary won the championship of the L. LA. A. for the first time in the history of 
the college. 

Coach Norton was blessed with plenty of good material to practice with ; the scrubs 
and varsity were often equally matched. The Coushat.a boys, due to former teamwork 
and experience, had the edge on the other men, and around ihem the squad was built. 

The first few games showed what possibilities were wrapped up in the squad. The 
results were gratifying, and both coach and players worked overtime to develop the wonder 
team of the state. 

After splitting with Normal on the home floor, the test of the season came with a 
gruelling trip through Mississippi and Tennessee, meeting the best college teams in those 
sections. We won two from Millsaps and split with Mississippi College. Then came 
the greatest victory of the season when we defeated "Ole Miss" for the first time she had 
been defeated on her home court in many years. We lost the last games because the team 
was worn out by the long trip. 

The team returned home, and after a few days of rest they defeated Louisiana Col- 
lege and. S. L. I. I. two games each. 

Then came the last games of the season with a trip through South Louisiana, winning 
two games each from Louisiana College and S. L. I. I. College, then to Normal to battle 
in the crucial game for the state championship of the L. I. A. A. They won, after a 
hard-fought game, by a good margin, and the championship was ours. 



Page m'nefp-one 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




The season closed with a defeat because the boys were jaded and tired, and knew 
the result would not affect the standing as state champions. 

The entire squad will return next season, with the exception of Armstrong, who grad- 
uates this year, and Centenary is assured of another championship. 



Games and Scores 

C. C. L 18; Normal 24 

C. C. L 26; Normal 17 

C. C. L 58; Rusk College II 

C. C. L 62; Rusk Co'lege 8 

C. C. L 105; Belcher II 

C. C. L 17; Millsaps 11 

C. C. L 25; Millsaps 10 

C. C. L 15; Mississippi College 14 

C. C. L 10; Mississippi College 15 

C. C. L 21 ; Mississippi University 15 



C. C. L 20; Union University 

C. C. L 24; Memphis Y. M. C. A. 

C. C. L 34; Louisiana Colleg: . 



34 
33 
16 

C. C. L 26; Louisiana College 13 

15 
20 
14 



C. C. L 15; Louisiana College 13 

C. C. L 25; Louisiana College 13 

C. C. L 28; Normal 21 

C. C. L 17; Normal 22 



C. C. L 


28; S. L. I. I 


C. C. L 


31; S. L. I. I 


C. C. L 


29; S. L. I. I 


C. C. L 


36; S. L. I. I 



Page ninety-two 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Girls Basketball Team 



Mary Ella Carleton 
Doris Clark 
Lillian Craig 
Roma Craig 
Bessie Gardner 



Elizabeth Henry 
Alsie Lea 
Delia Munday 
Edna Raulins 



Rebecca Rockefeller 
Hazel Smith 
Christine Smith 
Sallie Walters 
Yetta Velinsky 



Page ninety- three 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





MRS. BROWN 
Baseball Sponsor 



Page ninety-four 



YONCOPIN, 1922 



g gp^L 





W. C. HoneycuTT, Manager 



W. B. Worley, Captain 



Baseball 

W. C. HONEYCUTT, Manager 
This is his senior year in college. He has always given his whole-hearted support to 
athletics. We knew that we were not making a mistake when we elected him to this 
position. 

W. B. Worley, Captain 
"Red" has been with us three years, and played on the varsity three years. He is a 
good all-around man and a hard worker. 



Page ninety-five 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





BASEBALL PLAYERS 



Pag: ninety-six 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





KODAK PICTURES 



Page ninety-seven 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Commercial Department 



Roll 

James Airey 
Warren Beckam 
Robert Brown 
Elizabeth Burgess 
Stith Bynum 
Cephus Cady 
Sidney L. Conger 
Dave Eastbourne 
Ma jrice Ellington 
Harry Fisher 
Burton Fontenot 
Bessie Gardner 
Carol Gamm 
Randall Harlow 
ALtERT Harper 
Lewis Henry 

H. W. Jordan 



Alton Keoun 
J. B. Kent 
James Knight 
R. L. McCormxk 
Loye McDade 
Carrol McGhee 
Ragan Nelson 
William Palmer 
George Pattison 
Arthur Pullln 
A. C. Skannel 
Angus Snell 
Yet ia Velinsky 
Richard Walford 
Eugene Williamson 
Wyeth Worley 



Pag? ninety-eight 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





H 
Z 

UJ 

H 

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UJ 

a 

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o 

UJ 

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Page ninety-nine 



YONCOPIN, 1922 








Officers 01 CI 



asses 



Senior 

Jack Fullilove President 

Francis Lawles Vice-President 

Delia Munday Secretary and Treasurer 

Christine Smith Reporter 

Juniors 

Luther Grounds President 

LEON Scales Vice-President 

Flavia Tigner Secretary and Treasurer 

Alsie Lee Reporter 

Sophomores 

Ev McClanahan President 

Edwin Moore Vice-President 

Hazel Smith Secretary and Treasurer 

Helen Hope Marston Reporter 

Freshmen 

D. B. King President 

R. M. Cook Vice-President 

Whitfield Williams Secretary and Treasurer 

Roma Craig Reporter 



Page one hundred 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Centenary Academy 



Gordon Adger 
Joe Allen 
John Allen 
Knox Austin 
W. G. Banks 
J. Minten Bauguss 
G. R. Barnett 
Taylor Barnes 
Beverly Boisseau 
Leon Booth 
Willie Bostain 
Clark. Brock 
Pat Brown 
Theron Brown 

E. J. Buck 
Robert Burns 
Richard Bynum 

F. C. Cady 
Edwin Carlisle 
Ernie C. Carpenter 
Alton Carrington 
Lloyd Clanton 
Doris Clark 

Tom Conger 
Robert M. Cook 
Lillian Craig 
Martha Craig 
Roma Craig 
Kevil Crider 
Charles Dennis 
Lela Dennis 
Carolyn Dorman 
Edgar Dufrene 
Fruman Few 
Minor T. Ford 



Roll 

Burton Fontenot 
G. L. Fox 
Jack Fullilove 
Samford Fullilove 
Tom Fullilove 
Carol Gamm 
Albert Gauthreaux 
Grant Good 
L. Grounds 
Frank Hatch 
Jimmie Helm 
Cecil Henry 
Elizabeth Henry 
Roscoe Holland 
Jim Horton 
John Kennedy 
J. E. King 
Donald Lavine 
F. R. Lawler 
Alsie Lea 
John Lipscomb 
Haywood Manhein 
Helen Hope Marston 
W. E. Miller 
Miller Mims 
Lois Montgomery 
Edwin Moore 
Gordon Lee Morcan 
Delia Munday 
E. McClanahan 
Katherine McClure 
R. L. McCormack 
Loye McDade 

LUCILE McGuFFIE 



Arthur McKenzie 
Edward Neild 
William Noel 
Thelma Parish 
Gaillard Phillips 
John Pleasant 
Jimm;e Ponder 
Breaux Prosser 
Henry Ragan 
Edna Raulins 
Vernon Rich 
Jack Roeder 
Paul Rushing 
Leon Scales 
Louis Sepaugh 
Frank Silsbee 
Mildred Silsbee 
Christine Smith 
Foster Smith 
Paul Taylor 
Maribel Thompson 
William Thompson 
Leslie Lee Tigner 
Flavia Tigner 
Dick Towery 
Richard Walford 
Robert Warren 
Eugene Watts 
J. W. Weatherall 
Thurston Wheeler 
Whitfield Williams 
Mozele Wilson 
Da„e Worley 
Herbert Youngblood 
Billie Youngblood 



Page one hundred one 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Page one hundred lv>o 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




Who's Who? 



Most popular professor Mr. Evans 

Most popular boy • Jimmy Horton 

Most popular girl Doris Clark 

Best student MAUDE SPAULDING 

Prettiest girl Delia Munday 

Ugliest boy Carol Gamm 

Wittiest Donald Lavine 

Vamp Athlene Madding 

Best athlete JlMMY Helm 

Busiest Arthur Pullen 

Best all-round LUTHER GROUNDS 

Crouch Miller Mims 

Jelly bean PAUL TAYLOR 

Type of girl preferred BRUNETTE 

In love rvith himself Willie MlLLER 

Greenest of the verdant W. G. Banks, Jr. 

Fatty Arbuckle RlCHARD CoORPENDER 

Young Socrates Robert Warren 

Favorite occupation Slinging THE Bull 

Favorite study PHYSICS 

Reason for coming to Centenary Got Lost 

Type of boy preferred White Leads 

Best looking boy Joe ALLEN 



Page one hundred three 




Academy Seniors 



Gordon Adger 

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



John Allen 

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



Doris Clark 

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



F. C. Cady 

ORANGE, TEXAS 



Jack Fullilove 

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



Page one hundred four 




YONCOPIN, 1922 



Academy Seniors 



F. R. Lawler 

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



Miller Mims 

CROWLEY, LOUISIANA 



Delia Munday 

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



Willie Miller 

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



Arthur Pullen 

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 




Page one hundred five 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Academy Seniors 



Christine Smith 

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



William Thompson 

HOSSTON, LOUISIANA 



Thurston Wheeler 

TREES CITY, LOUISIANA 



Seniors oi S 



ummer 



T 



erm, 22 



Alton Carrington Logansport, La. 

Carol Gamm Shreveport, La. 

JlMMIE HORTON Shreveport, La. 

DONALD Lavine Shreveport, La. 

Lewis SEPAUGH Shreveport, La, 



Page one hundred six 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




a- 



■a 



GRIND SECTION 



In the following we are endeavoring to give you a true and natural replica 
of campus characteristics. If those mentioned are not pleased with our inter- 
pretation, see us. 



H. 



■E 




Campus Clubs of Note 

The Toothpick Club 
Officers 

B. C. Taylor President 

R. W. GoDBOLD Vice-President 

J. V. HENDRICKS Secretary and Treasurer 

Faculty Honorary Members 
Professors Cline and Honeycutt 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

1 . Members must always have toothpick on person in case of emergencies. 

2. Must be used after every meal. 

3. If possible, extend its use into the class immediately after noon. 

4. If members are caught using toothpick in private they will be fined by the com- 
mittee on rules and regulations. 

5. A prize will be awarded to the member who manages to ply his toothpick in the 
midst of the largest crowd, who uses it the most gracefully, oftenest, and stays with it 
the longest. 

From all present indications we feel safe in saying that the reward will be won, and 
indeed earned, by the club's president. 



Page one hundred seven 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




The White Sox Club 
Officers 

E. V. Levie President 

Pete Mitchell Vice-President 

H. H. Norton Secretary 

Albert Harfer . . - Treasurer 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

1 . Members are required at all times to wear their snowy emblem. 

2. They should wear their trousers as short as possible and low dark shoes, so that 
the brotherhood may distinguish each other at the distance of at least one mile. 

3. If sox are not kept pure and white at all times, the wearer will be forced to wear 
dark ones in their stead. Thus far this severe ruling has not had to be enforced. They 
are indeed a loyal and staunch group. 

The Courting Society 

(Only faculty members eligible; students eliminated on account of inexperience and 
the amount of forbidden honey involved.) 

There are no permanent officers, the members rotating into prominence according to 
headway made in room No. 6. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

1 . The crusher must make the abcde of the crushee at least three t:mes per week. 

2. No more than $1 and not less than 25 cents must be blown in one outing. 

3. In case of inclement weather, a yellow cab must be chartered. 

4. For refreshments the fair one may serve popcorn, provided the male participant 
be "popper." 



Page one hundred eight 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Page one hundred nine 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Page one hundred ten 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





Page one hundred eleven 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




J. A. STYRON ENGRAVING CO. 

408 Milam Street, Next to Ardis Building 

WEDDING INVITATIONS, ANNOUNCEMENTS, CARDS 
AND FINE STATIONERY 



JUST A BIG BOOST FOR CENTENARY 

All the Yearround Gifts for<C$Kids 




^ 




613-615 TEXAS ST. — ~ » BOTH. PHONES Ill8« 




ESTABLISHED 1874 



ESTABLISHED 1874 



The Store That Has Grown Up with Shreveport and Kept Pace 
with Shreveport's Progress 

48 YEARS IN SHREVEPORT 



COMMERCIAL NATIONAL BANK 

SHREVEPORT, LA. 

North Louisiana's Largest Individual Bank. 
Capital and Surplus, $1,300,000 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





M.LEVY CO., Inc. 

"HOME OF GOOD CLOTHES" 

LEVY BUILDING TEXAS and EDWARDS STS. 

SHREVEPORXLA. 

Greater Shreveport's Greatest Clothiers 

Stein-Bloch and Fashion-Park Clothes 

Manhattan and Eagle Shirts 

Dobbs and Stetson Hats 

American Hosiery Company Underwear 

Munsingwear 

College Sweaters 



HOWARD MOTOR COMPANY 



AUTHORIZED 



THE UNIVERSAL CAB 



DEALERS 



825 Texas Avenue 



Frost Whited Building 



SHREVEPORT, LA. 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




CENTENARY COLLEGE 

(CHARTERED 1839) 
AS 

Alma Mater 



GREETS 



The Yoncopin 

And Its Thousands of Readers — and Invites 

Them to a Closer Acquaintance with 

This Standard A Grade College 



CENTENARY'S PAST 

IS SECURE — With 80 years of noble serv- 
ice to the youth of the Southland. 

CENTENARY'S PRESENT 

IS SATISFACTORY— With abundant rec- 
ognition by State authorities and Great 
Educational Boards — North and South. 

CENTENARY'S FUTURE 

IS SAFE — With adequate endowment 
funds to guarantee perpetuity. 



FOR FREE YEAR BOOK ADDRESS 

PRESIDENT, GEO. S. SEXTON 

SHREVEPORT, LA. 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




NELSON'S 



HOME OF HART SCHAFFNER AND 
MARX CLOTHES 

Satisfaction or Money Back 



Frank L. — Geo. O. — Robt. L. — Sam K. 

Baird Bros. Shoe Co. 

Incorporated 

Fine Shoes — Hosiery Too 



520 Texas Street 
SHREVEPORT, LA. 



Tekolski & Freedman 

ARTISTIC JEWELERS 

419 Texas Street 
SHREVEPORT, LA. 



ROLL 0SB0RN & SONS 
Funeral Service 

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



Cockrell's Studio 

Over Peyton's Drug Store 

PHOTOGRAPHS 
KODAK FINISHING 



Old Phone 2624 



Diamonds Watches Jewelry 

"Service Our Motto" 

SILVERBURG JEWELRY 
COMPANY 

Watch and Jewelry 
Repairing 

Old Phone 2723 
400 Texas St. Shreveport, La. 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




THOS. FULLER, President 



J. F. WILKERSON, Vice-President 



STAG CLOTHING COMPANY 

413-415 TEXAS STREET, SHREVEPORT, LA. 
EXCLUSIVE DEALERS IN 

EVERYTHING TO WEAR 

MEN, YOUNG MEN AND BOYS 

Plainly Speaking, We Want Your Business 



J. T. WHITTEN 



JOHN A. KEEL, Secretary-Treasurer 



PHELPS 
SHOES 

ARE GOOD 
SHOES 



Hirsch & Leman Co. 

Booksellers and Stationers. 

Exclusive Representatives for 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

and 

Draper-Maynard Co. 

Athletic Goods 



SHREVEPORT, LA. 



J. C. BAKER COMPANY 

WALL PAPER, PAINTS, GLASS 
We Frame Pictures 



OLD PHONE 2898 



621 Texas Street 



Shreveport, Louis'ana 



AFTER COLLEGE DAYS— WHAT? 

The average college boy is a level-headed youngster, full of plans and ideals and 
hopes for his future after leaving college. Many of these fellows are depositing their 
surplus loose change in this bank at 4 per cent compound interest. By the time their 
college days are over, they'll have "something ahead" to start with. Not a bad idea, eh? 

This bank is open every business day from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

CITY SAVINGS BANK & TRUST COMPANY 



C. C. HARDMAN COMPANY 



Wall Paper, Paints, Roofing, Glass 

White Pine and Hardwood Doors 
and Windows 



620 Texas Street 



SHREVEPORT, LA. 



PLANNING THAT FUTURE HOME? 

You will want it of the highest grade lumber and millwork ; and you'll want many 
of the convenience features now built in every modern home. That's why we'd like to 
figure with you on your 

LUMBER AND MILLWORK 

bill, our catalog No. 21 is replete with convenience feature designs for every style home. 

VICTORIA LUMBER CO., LTD. 

"In Business Since the Civil War" 



VICTROLA 




VICTOR RECORDS 



SPECIALIZING IN 
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S FASHIONABLE APPAREL 

Prices Universally Moderate 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





There Is Pride in Possession of Good Luggage 

Every boy and girl who leaves home to attend school or college should have a good 
trunk and a good traveling bag. By "good" we mean one that will last for years and 
always look well. Girls, particularly, should have a Wardrobe Trunk, one like our 
Rogers Trunk — as good as any other make — which sells for $100.00, we sell for $40.00. 
You will find in our store every kind of trunk and bag you would want. Come in and 
look 'em over. 

Kidd-Russ Trunk & Bag Co. 

519 M LAM STREET 



CADDO ARMS & CYCLE COMPANY, Inc. 



610 MILAM STREET 



OLD PHONE 392 



Everything for the Sportsman 

Baseball Goods — Basketball Goods 
Football Goods — Athletic Goods 
Guns and Rifles — Ammunition — Bicycles 



REPAIR DEPARTMENT, 620 LOUISIANA AVENUE 

OLD PHONE 4354 NEW PHONE 917 



M. F. ALFRLD 



W. S. BAIRD 



A. B. PICTURE COMPANY 

KODAK FINISHERS 

We Develop and Print "As You Like It" 



243 Vine Street 



CId Phone 3730 



SHREVEPORT, LA. 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




DREYFUSS DRY 
GOODS CO. 



Where Quality Is Up 
and Prices Down 



First to Show the 

Advance Styles 

EACH SEASON 



PIANOS 

STANDARD MAKES ONLY 

PHONOGRAPHS 

VICTOR VICTROLA 



KODAKS 

If it Isn't an Eastman, it isn't a 
Kodak 



JEWELRY 

Reliability Secret of Our Success 

Hutchinson Bros. 

Established 1896 



Buckelew 
Hardware Co. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

REACH 
ATHLETIC GOODS 

"Big League Standard" 



BUCKELEW 
HARDWARE CO. 

Texas and Springs Sts. 
Phone 506 



FRIEND HARDWARE 
COMPANY 

Goldsmith's Sporting Goods 

Russell & Erwin Builders' Hardware 

Estate Ranges 

Reznor Heaters 

Herrick Refrigerators 

Wear-Ever Aluminum 

S12-514 Texas St. SHREVEPORT, LA. 



Keller- Youngblood 
Jewelry Co., Inc. 

CLASS RINGS AND PINS 
MADE TO ORDER 

605 MILAM STREET 
Majestic Theater Building 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




For Generations the Name 
Has Signified the Utmost 



CARTER-ALLEN 

Jewelry Company 

GOLD, SILVER, PLATINUM AND 
DIAMOND MERCHANTS 



Your Gift Counselors 

The Carter-Allen Jewelry Company is glad of this oppor- 
tunity to inscribe its name in a book that will be kept forever 
as a history and reminiscence of your days at Centenary. 

Friendships made with your faculty and students, with 
the attendant opportunity to be of service in various ways, 
form a chapter in the history of our business that we shall 
always cherish. 

Your graduates will enter their several professions in life; 
your student body will remain to uphold the standards of 
"Old Centenary" — and to each we extend our sincere good 
wishes for success and good fortune and express the hope that 
our service thus far will be but the beginning of a lifelong 
relation of trust and friendship. 



322 TEXAS STREET 



SHREVEPORT 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




ASK ANY PATRON OF OURS 

And They Will Tell You That We Handle the Best of 

MEATS, POULTRY AND GAME 

When in Season. Last but Not Least — Our Delivery 
Service Can't Be Equaled 



CITY MARKET 



705 TEXAS STREET 



Old Phone 4124 



New Phone 65 



THIS IS 

YOUR 

DRUG STORE 

// Keeps a Clean 
Fountain 

MAJESTIC DRUG STORE 



HOTEL YOUREE 

Banquets and Special 
Parties Solicited 

Shreveport's Social Center 
Phone 4300 



'I SCREAM FOR PURITY" 



Campbell's Ice Cream Factory 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
ICE CREAM, FRUIT ICES AND CANDY 



We Appreciate Your Patronage 
1321 Texas Avenue SHREVEPORT, LA. 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




R. 


ABRAMS, 


The 


People's 


Tailor 




Four-Piece 


Suits to Order 


at $25.00, $30.00, $35.00, $40.00 


This price 


inc 


ludes an extra ps 


dr pants 


with every three 


;-piece suit. 


An i 


extra pair 


of 


pants will double 


the life 


of your suit and 


it does not 


cost 


you one cent. 












i 




Majestic Building, 


Third Floor 






1 




OLD 


PHONE 4757 







THE HEARNE DRY GOODS CO. 

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 

An institution distributing only dependable merchandise, buying for 
cash, giving its patrons full benefit of its saving methods of merchandising, 
endeavoring to give unequaled service, maintaining a reputation for abso- 
lute fairness and unquestioned reliability, and selling at one consistently 
low price to all. 



HERE'S A REAL 
QUESTION? 

Ask your Mother, ask Dad, ask 
Sister or ask yourself this ques- 
tion — 

"Where Do You Shop?" 

Do it now! We're interested in a 
Greater Centenary — and we're go- 
ing to interest you in a "Greater 
Store." 

Make it a point to watch our ads 
and our show windows. It will 
pay you. 

Get acquainted with the best 
Ladies' Ready-to-Wear, Millinery 
and Dry Goods in Shreveport, and 
at the best prices, too. 

HILL, SOLLIE & RICHEY 

Incorporated 
"The Store People Are Talking About" 



Every Day Begins 
With Coffee 

Have You Tried Ours? 



ROASTERS 



SHREVEPORT, LA. 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




THE DESIGNERS OF OUR CLOTHES 

I I AVE been particularly considerate of college fellows, preparing spe- 

*■ * cial "Prep" models — that give a new interpretation of slender smart- 
ness to the youthful physique. Tailored of highest grade woolens, ours 
are the ideal clothes for you. 

Featuring "America s Best" 

Hart Schaffner & Marx 
and Hickey-Freeman 



CLOTHES 



Haberdashers 



Oiv. Texas Street o.t Edwa.rds 

Shreveport, La. 



Hatters 



Renfro's Pharmacy 

The Special Delivery Service 
Drug Store 

"No Order Too Small, 
No Place Too Far" 

KODAK SUPPLIES 



Columbia Cafe 

Clean, Quick Service 

WHOLESOME FOOD 

At Moderate Prices 
For Ladies and Gentlemen 

521 Market Street 



WRAY-DICKINSON COMPANY, Inc. 



^%>th£ 



THE UNIVERSAL CAB 

WE SELL ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES 

CARS PARTS SERVICE 

306-310 MARKET STREET, SHREVEPORT, LA. 



YONCOPIN, 1922 




LET YOUR STATIONERY BE YOUR 
BEST SALESMAN 


M. 


w. 


DRAKE, Inc. 




SERVICE PRINTERS 


218 Texas Street 


Shreveport, La. 
OLD PHONE 441 



DICKINSON MOTORS, Inc. 



NORTH LOUISIANA 

EAST TEXAS 
SOUTH ARKANSAS 



Distributors 

Hudson Super-Six, Essex Motor Cars 



SALES DEPARTMENT 

PHONE 1062 



SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

PHONE 1218 



"America's Dominant Cars" 

Marshall and Crockett Streets 



YONCOPIN, 1922 





YONCOPIN, 1922 




"AT YOUR SERVICE" 

Getting his clothes together to send to the laundry is the college fellow's chief 
bogey. He is usually "Persnickity," however, about his clothes, demanding that they 
look just so. For convenience of the Centenary Men, we have secured the service of 
Mr. R. W. Godbold on the Centenary Campus, who is our agent for the college. See 
Mr. Godbold for our rates, and let him send in your bundle, or call 680. 

EXCELSIOR LAUNDRY 

"WHERE QUALITY COUNTS" 



SPALDING FOR SPORT 

When Furchasinsr Athletic Equipment, Insist Upon 

"SPALDINGS" 
A. G. SPALDING & BROTHERS 

130 Carondelet Street Satisfaction Is Inevitable. NEW ORLEANS, LA. 




PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 




YONCOPIN, 1922 





. . 




^ More than ninety universities, colleges and schools of 
the South favored us with their Annual printing contracts 
for the year 1922. 

^ This phenomenal record is the natural result of the high 
quality of workmanship displayed in all our publications, 
coupled with the very complete service rendered the Staff. 

^ From the beginning to the end we are your counselor 
and adviser in the financing, collecting, and editing of 
your book. 

^ Surely if "Experience is the best teacher," as an old 
maxim says, then our service must be supreme. Decide 
right now to know more about our work and service. 
Simply write for our proposition. 



« 



College Annual Headquarters" 



Illil 



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